Why Learn from Autopsy.Online?

 
  


Why clinicians or clinical rotations?

  • Improve care and clinical decision-making for active cases by looking up relevant disease processes, conditions, surgeries, and outcomes.
  • Enhance career risk-management by learning from adverse outcomes presented from various perspectives (decision-making, communication, diagnostic considerations, etc.).
  • Prepare for a surgery or enhance post-operative care by viewing similar cases.
  • Prepare for medical procedures (intubation, chest tubes, central lines) by viewing actual anatomy.
  • Balance radiographic data by staying grounded in real internal anatomy.
  • Mitigate adverse events by studying various healing changes, complications, and adverse outcomes.
  • Expand clinical experience and training with varied case types and levels of complexity (HeRO graft, TIPS, Crohn’s disease, VATS, Roux-en-Y, etc.)
  • Strengthen clinical thinking by learning how other clinicians address issues, or analyzing care planning.
  • Utilize content for presentations, grand rounds, Morbidity and Mortality conference, and teaching sessions to illustrate clinical points.
  • Quick-access, intuitive search for busy providers.
  • Quick-save content of interest into easy-access bookmarks.

 

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Why an anatomy course?

  • View basic and detailed anatomy from real patients.
  • Understand organ, system, and cavity-space relationships with multiples views, patients, manipulations, and dissection techniques.
  • Balanced anatomy identification and discovery.
  • Multiple questions to guide anatomic discovery, physiologic and clinical understanding and encourage higher-level thinking.
  • Motivate students with clinical context, anatomic meaning, and case purpose.
  • Collaborative group work like anatomy lab. Interactive video allows synced viewing and shared on-video annotation.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Balance radiographic and stylized digital tools by comparing to real anatomy.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Pre-set curriculum options, depending on course level.

 

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Why a pre-clinical course?

  • Function as a sim lab, starting with the clinical history and physical exam, and using the anatomy for evidenced-based learning.
  • Explore medical ethics, considering patient, clinician, and system issues that factored into outcomes.
  • Enhance topics of health and disease, surgeries, and procedures by studying illustrative cases.
  • Ground training and background for medical procedures (intubation, chest tubes, central lines) by viewing actual anatomy.
  • Ready students for patients with varied care needs and physical exams (muscle atrophy, decubitus ulcers, incisions, ascites, etc.)
  • Individual and group formats for assignments or collaboration.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Multiple case-based questions to guide case-thinking and encourage higher-level thinking.
  • Basic identification guideposts to assist with case understanding.
  • Balance radiographic and digital data to keep your students grounded in actual patients.
  • Flexible content-matching for any course purpose: Assign students to one or a few cases (patients) to follow over a course. Allow students to see their growth as course content becomes applicable to the case; or mix-and-match content across cases to highlight concepts.

 

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Why pathology training?

  • Learn from multiple autopsies.
  • Study varied pathology and master the physiologic consequences of disease.
  • View histology.
  • Gain clinical context by incorporating the clinical history.
  • Train students of various levels, from introductory (technique) to advanced (with comprehensive case analysis).
  • Individual and group formats for assignments or collaboration.
  • Utilize content for presentations and teaching sessions.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Multiple case-based questions to guide case-thinking and encourage higher-level thinking.

 

Back to top

 
  

Why clinicians or clinical rotations?

  • Improve care and clinical decision-making for active cases by looking up relevant disease processes, conditions, surgeries, and outcomes.
  • Enhance career risk-management by learning from adverse outcomes presented from various perspectives (decision-making, communication, diagnostic considerations, etc.).
  • Prepare for a surgery or enhance post-operative care by viewing similar cases.
  • Prepare for medical procedures (intubation, chest tubes, central lines) by viewing actual anatomy.
  • Balance radiographic data by staying grounded in real internal anatomy.
  • Mitigate adverse events by studying various healing changes, complications, and adverse outcomes.
  • Expand clinical experience and training with varied case types and levels of complexity (HeRO graft, TIPS, Crohn’s disease, VATS, Roux-en-Y, etc.)
  • Strengthen clinical thinking by learning how other clinicians address issues, or analyzing care planning.
  • Utilize content for presentations, grand rounds, Morbidity and Mortality conference, and teaching sessions to illustrate clinical points.
  • Quick-access, intuitive search for busy providers.
  • Quick-save content of interest into easy-access bookmarks.

 

Back to top


 
 

Why a pre-clinical course?

  • Function as a sim lab, starting with the clinical history and physical exam, and using the anatomy for evidenced-based learning.
  • Explore medical ethics, considering patient, clinician, and system issues that factored into outcomes.
  • Enhance topics of health and disease, surgeries, and procedures by studying illustrative cases.
  • Ground training and background for medical procedures (intubation, chest tubes, central lines) by viewing actual anatomy.
  • Ready students for patients with varied care needs and physical exams (muscle atrophy, decubitus ulcers, incisions, ascites, etc.)
  • Individual and group formats for assignments or collaboration.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Multiple case-based questions to guide case-thinking and encourage higher-level thinking.
  • Basic identification guideposts to assist with case understanding.
  • Balance radiographic and digital data to keep your students grounded in actual patients.
  • Flexible content-matching for any course purpose: Assign students to one or a few cases (patients) to follow over a course. Allow students to see their growth as course content becomes applicable to the case; or mix-and-match content across cases to highlight concepts.

 

Back to top

 
 

 

Why an anatomy course?

  • View basic and detailed anatomy from real patients.
  • Understand organ, system, and cavity-space relationships with multiples views, patients, manipulations, and dissection techniques.
  • Balanced anatomy identification and discovery.
  • Multiple questions to guide anatomic discovery, physiologic and clinical understanding and encourage higher-level thinking.
  • Motivate students with clinical context, anatomic meaning, and case purpose.
  • Collaborative group work like anatomy lab. Interactive video allows synced viewing and shared on-video annotation.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Balance radiographic and stylized digital tools by comparing to real anatomy.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Pre-set curriculum options, depending on course level.

 

Back to top

 
 

 

Why pathology training?

  • Learn from multiple autopsies.
  • Study varied pathology and master the physiologic consequences of disease.
  • View histology.
  • Gain clinical context by incorporating the clinical history.
  • Train students of various levels, from introductory (technique) to advanced (with comprehensive case analysis).
  • Individual and group formats for assignments or collaboration.
  • Utilize content for presentations and teaching sessions.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Multiple case-based questions to guide case-thinking and encourage higher-level thinking.

 

Back to top

 
  

Why clinicians or clinical rotations?

  • Improve care and clinical decision-making for active cases by looking up relevant disease processes, conditions, surgeries, and outcomes.
  • Enhance career risk-management by learning from adverse outcomes presented from various perspectives (decision-making, communication, diagnostic considerations, etc.).
  • Prepare for a surgery or enhance post-operative care by viewing similar cases.
  • Prepare for medical procedures (intubation, chest tubes, central lines) by viewing actual anatomy.
  • Balance radiographic data by staying grounded in real internal anatomy.
  • Mitigate adverse events by studying various healing changes, complications, and adverse outcomes.
  • Expand clinical experience and training with varied case types and levels of complexity (HeRO graft, TIPS, Crohn’s disease, VATS, Roux-en-Y, etc.)
  • Strengthen clinical thinking by learning how other clinicians address issues, or analyzing care planning.
  • Utilize content for presentations, grand rounds, Morbidity and Mortality conference, and teaching sessions to illustrate clinical points.
  • Quick-access, intuitive search for busy providers.
  • Quick-save content of interest into easy-access bookmarks.

 

Back to top

 

 

Why a pre-clinical course?

  • Function as a sim lab, starting with the clinical history and physical exam, and using the anatomy for evidenced-based learning.
  • Explore medical ethics, considering patient, clinician, and system issues that factored into outcomes.
  • Enhance topics of health and disease, surgeries, and procedures by studying illustrative cases.
  • Ground training and background for medical procedures (intubation, chest tubes, central lines) by viewing actual anatomy.
  • Ready students for patients with varied care needs and physical exams (muscle atrophy, decubitus ulcers, incisions, ascites, etc.)
  • Individual and group formats for assignments or collaboration.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Multiple case-based questions to guide case-thinking and encourage higher-level thinking.
  • Basic identification guideposts to assist with case understanding.
  • Balance radiographic and digital data to keep your students grounded in actual patients.
  • Flexible content-matching for any course purpose: Assign students to one or a few cases (patients) to follow over a course. Allow students to see their growth as course content becomes applicable to the case; or mix-and-match content across cases to highlight concepts.

 

Back to top

 
 

 

Why an anatomy course?

  • View basic and detailed anatomy from real patients.
  • Understand organ, system, and cavity-space relationships with multiples views, patients, manipulations, and dissection techniques.
  • Balanced anatomy identification and discovery.
  • Multiple questions to guide anatomic discovery, physiologic and clinical understanding and encourage higher-level thinking.
  • Motivate students with clinical context, anatomic meaning, and case purpose.
  • Collaborative group work like anatomy lab. Interactive video allows synced viewing and shared on-video annotation.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Balance radiographic and stylized digital tools by comparing to real anatomy.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Pre-set curriculum options, depending on course level.

 

Back to top

 
 

 

Why pathology training?

  • Learn from multiple autopsies.
  • Study varied pathology and master the physiology consequences of disease.
  • View histology.
  • Gain clinical context by incorporating the clinical history.
  • Train students of various levels, from introductory (technique) to advanced (with comprehensive case analysis).
  • Individual and group formats for assignments or collaboration.
  • Utilize content for presentations and teaching sessions.
  • Organizational tools for searches, one-step bookmarking and note-taking.
  • Multiple case-based questions to guide case-thinking and encourage higher-level thinking.

 

Back to top